The law of cosmic forces

The law of cosmic forces

Nature follows the law of cosmic forces. It is slow, predictable, and dependable. When you sow corn in spring, you get corn in autumn and not wheat or barley. 

Day follows night and night follows day. These cyclical patterns can be relied upon and calculated. We may not know its definite purpose, but we can trust it.

Watching the nightly sky 

The rotational path of the planets, and their relation to each other have been the same for millions and billions of years. 

We know that ancient astronomers as far back as 10,000 B.C. and most likely before observed the night sky regularly, tracking the positions and movements of celestial bodies over time. They noted the wandering motion of certain objects against the background of fixed stars. The term “planet” itself comes from the Greek word for “wanderer.”

At first, these observations were made with the naked eye. Later handheld devices called astrolabes recorded time and established the exact positions of celestial objects.

Armillary spheres are models of celestial spheres, featuring rings. First used by Chinese astronomers around 400 B.C. they demonstrated the positions and motions of celestial objects and enabled detailed calculations.

Different cultures tracked different celestial bodies

Stonehenge: The Druids mainly tracked the cycle of the sun, especially the solstices, and the cycle of the moon.  The Full Moon nights were important dates used for gatherings and celebrations.

Mayan Observatories:  like El Caracol in Chichen Itza tracked the movements of the planets, particularly important was Venus. This tradition was shared with the Minoans, if coincidental or not is not clear. 

Babylonian Astronomy: used clay tablets and recorded their findings in cuneiform scripts.   This enabled them to make detailed observations and keep records of tracked positions. These records could be used to predict their future movements. Babylonian astronomers observed the circle of the animals, now known as the twelve constellations and houses.

    Greek Astronomy: Ptolemy’s geocentric model, while later replaced by the heliocentric model, accurately predicted planetary positions using a complex system of epicycles. Meton recorded that 19-solar years equal 235 lunations, the backbone of the lunisolar calendar. 

    The Ancient Greeks were also the first to observe Retrograde Motions. As the name suggests, planets seem to go periodically backwards in the sky. ‘Mercury retrograde’ is now fashionable on instagram, but clearly not a new concept. All planets enter retrograde phases, some short (Mercury takes 21 days and the next retrograde phase is 13th December to 2nd January 2024). Other long (Pluto is 5.5 months.) In 2024 Pluto turns retrograde on the 2nd May, lasting until the 12th October.

    Chinese Astronomy: Chinese astronomers kept meticulous records of celestial events, including planetary movements, comets, and supernovae.  They also found methods for predicting planetary positions such as conjunctions and oppositions of planets, nowadays still in use in astrological charts.

    What we can learn from the law of cosmic forces

    The weather may be unpredictable, but the path of the universe is not! There is not one day on earth when the sun all of a sudden won’t shine (even when covered by clouds) or the gravitational pull is disabled and objects won’t fall to the ground.

    Humans have free will and with it have achieved a lot.  But with free will also comes unpredictability. We often try to reinvent the wheel, but let’s face it a wheel is perfect and does not need improving.

    If you look at the overriding law of nature – it is balance! The Waxing and the Waning Moon has the same length of time, as does the New and the Full Moon. The length of days varies during the year, but the northern hemisphere gets the same amount of long days as does the southern hemisphere.

    The planets and stars form patterns, creating stability and balance. Ultimately what humans really crave is balance and predicatbility. Therefore connecting to these ever-repeating cycles keeps us safe and guides us in what to expect.

    This is why I created the LWTM Lifestyle calendar, a way of predicting the months and year ahead!

    Working with these rhythms creates a sense of balance and stability and this can’t be over-emphasised in these unpredictable, erratic times.

    Once in a blue moon

    Once in a blue moon

    Have you ever heard the phrase – once in a blue moon. I should think so. So I delved a little deeper to find out what it really means and where it comes from. There are actually 2 varying versions of what we mean by a ‘Blue Moon’.

     

    1. Four full moons in a season 

    The first definition refers to a fourth full moon in a season. The year has four seasons: spring, summer, autumn, and winter.  Normally each season has 3 full moons. So that brings the yearly total to 12 full moons. The same reason why the year has 12  calendar months.

    The Ancient Roman year had 12 moon cycles and then a period of rest (roughly what we now call January and February).
    The new year started again in March.  This coincided with the start of the new military marching season, ruled by Mars, the God of war).   To keep the year in sync with the seasons occasionally another moon cycle was added, which then brought the total number of full moons to 13. This meant that one season had  4 full moons instead of 3 and the 4th full moon was called  ”a blue moon’. When Julius Caesar adopted the solar calendar model, he created 12 calendar months per year. (calendar comes from the Latin word for register) and abolished the13th month.

    Although the sun calendar replaced the former lunar model for official duties and taxes,  many pagan rituals were still celebrated in accordance with the moon cycle. When Emperor Constantin adopted Christianity as the ‘official Roman religion’ anything pagan got a bad press. The Catholic church rallied against the ancient pagan practices and the number 13 became the ‘number of witches’. It was hailed the unlucky number, especially if the combination fell on a Friday (the day of worship for Friga, the pagan fertility goddess). This lore is still alive in fairy stories. Do you remember the 12 good fairy godmothers in Sleeping Beauty and the 13th came to dinner and spoilt it all!

    To give you an idea of how often this happens –  The last ‘Blue Moon’ according to this definition occurred on 22nd August 2021. So on average, a Blue Moon happens every 2-3 years, hence the saying ‘ once in a blue moon’, meaning an event that is very rare.

    2. Two full moons in a calendar month

    Another way of describing a ‘blue moon’ came later. Normally a calendar month has one New Moon and one Full Moon, but occasionally 2 of each can occur in the same month. From the 19th century onwards it became popular to call the second Full Moon in a given calendar month ‘a blue moon’. Although still rare, this event occurs more randomly than the first definition. This month on August 31st a Blue Moon will be visible to us. According to old tradition make a wish and watch it come true!

     

    An Introduction to LWTM

    Please click this link to find out more about LWTM and holistic lifestyle planning and  download our freebies 

    Lunar and solar eclipses

    Lunar and solar eclipses

    Lunar and Solar Eclipses have been mythical events since the beginning of time. 

    Traditionally eclipses bring major changes, unpredictable situations, shocking revelations, and/or sudden endings. The advice used to be, don’t take too many risks or make too many changes during this unpredictable time. But eclipses can also be catalysts, showing up things that were hidden before which now are coming to light. For example, you become aware your partner is having an affair or a much more positive thought – for a while, your boss had you in mind for a promotion, but now it comes to light and you get the offer.

    Some Ancient rulers took the prediction of eclipses and their linked fate very seriously as they believed an eclipse signaled a bad omen. Almost 4000 years ago the Chinese king Zhong Kang beheaded 2 of his astronomers for failing to predict accurately when the next eclipse would appear. The Assyrians and later Babylonians were more accurate in their predictions.  One text mentions the solar eclipse during June 763 B.C. which was well observed and recorded.

    Another connection often made with eclipses is the appearance of natural disasters. The archaeologist Bruce Masse claimed that an eclipse happened at the time of a major meteor impact in the Indian Ocean on May 10th, 2807 B.C., and subsequent floods and tsunamis followed.

    Lunar eclipses: 

    There are total ( when the moon, sun, and earth practically align) and partial lunar eclipses  – when only part of the sun is darkened. Lunar eclipses are always linked to New Moons and only occur during this time. When you see a full lunar eclipse the moon (normally invisible at New Moon) turns dark red as illuminated not by the sun, but by the light coming from the earth’s atmosphere.

    Why don’t we see a lunar eclipse on every New Moon? 

    In fact, if the moon were to orbit in a perfect circle around the Earth, exactly this scenario would happen. But the lunar path is slightly tilted, in fact, leaning around 5 degrees, so it misses the perfect position by a bit. But occasionally the path slightly overlap (partial eclipse) and on rarer occasions perfectly align – that is then a full lunar eclipse.

    Here is a clip that shows exactly what happens during a lunar eclipse 

    Solar eclipses

    These only happen during Full Moon and we often speak of ‘eclipse cycles’. This means the planet’s parth rotate in a way that they align or overlap. On average 2-5 eclipses occur during one eclipse season,  lasting around 12-16 months. Total eclipses are very rare astronomical events that have had historically immense meanings and have always captured our imagination. So it is not surprising eclipses have been linked to important historical events. There apparently was a solar eclipse when Jesus died and another when Mohammed was born.

    In 1919 a total lunar eclipse blocked all sunlight for a full 6 minutes and 51 seconds, giving scientists time to measure the bending of the light from the stars. These findings were instrumental in the explanation of Einstein’s theory of general relativity.

    Find out more about historically significant solar eclipses  

    Join our community below for more information.

     An Introduction to LWTM

    Here is a link where you can download all our free resources to start building your new holistic life 

     

    Conceive with the moon

    Conceive with the moon

    moon goddess

    female fertility

    Looking at the moon cycle can be very helpful if you are trying (or not trying) to conceive. All women are of course familiar with the female fertility cycle also known as the biological cycle.  Mid-cycle a woman ovulates and can conceive. This always occurs 14 days before the next period.

    But if this is the only time during the cycle that a woman can conceive how is it possible that so many women conceive outside these fertile days – at ‘ technically not possible’ times’?  There has to be more to it!

    This was the question that plagued the Czech doctor Eugen Jonas in the 1950ies.  He was a psychologist and listened to many stories of his female clients, who either suffered from unwanted pregnancies or lack of conceiving.

    He, therefore, decided to look more closely into the subject matter of female fertility. He unearthed fragments from Ancient Greek and particular Babylonian texts, where doctors successfully calculated the optimum time for conception and birth control using a method that overlapped the time of menstruation together with the path of the moon.  Combining these old texts with his research data he realized that each woman has a time in their cycle when she was more easily aroused and ready to conceive. This cycle varied from woman to woman, as it was dependent on the time she was born.

    For example, a  woman born on a full moon day would always find this time in the lunar cycle the easiest to conceive. He then named this second fertility cycle – the cosmobiological cycle.

    Once both cycles are taken into consideration, they form a nearly perfect birth control system that has a success rate of over 98%, higher than even the pill. But this system is completely free and natural and once you know how to use it, every woman can use this method to control her fertility – whatever her circumstances and wherever in the world she lives.

    I find it hard to believe that this system is not more widely known and available to all women.

    Here is an example of how to use this method. 

    The first step is to mark the start date of your last menstruation on your calendar. Then count 15 days on and this marks your ovulation date with a cross. As sperm can last up to 3 days and ovulation does not always happen bang on Day 15, I suggest you cross off 4 days before and 2 days after your calculated ovulation day. This should give you enough safety margin.

    So you should have crossed off Days 10 to 17 after the first day of your menstruation. This is your biological cycle and normally ‘natural birth control’ ends here with a success rate of around 55%. You can of course add additional measures like checking your daily temperature to make this method slightly more effective.

    But adding the next step should bring the rate up to a whopping 98%.

    The next step is to find out your cosmobiologcial date (the date within the moon cycle you were born).   I am sure you can research what the moon was doing on the day of your birth. You would come up with a date like 3 days after New Moon, 6 days before Full Moon, and so on.

    Then check a current moon calendar and find which date corresponds to the current moon cycle. At first, it may sound complicated, but once you know you were born on the 3rd day of the Waning Moon (so 3 days after the Full Moon) you can just mark it on the LWTM lifestyle calendar for the coming months and plan your fertility year ahead. 

    To make it easier here is an example of how to use the whole method:

    We assume here that the first date of your last period was on the 1st of January, so you would cross off all dates between the 10th to 17th of January. If you were born on a Full Moon (and we assume here that it falls on the 24th of January), then please cross off the period between the 20th and the 25th Jan.

    All the crossed-off days are the ones you can conceive, all other days should be safe for unprotected sex. However, with new partners, you should still opt for protected sex to keep you out of harm’s way for many sexually transmitted diseases. 

    Many women ovulate in exact accordance with the lunar cycle and the times won’t change too much. But some have shorter or longer cycles and dates will slightly shift or even overlap. If this happens, then these days are super fertile days and are of particular interest if you find it hard to conceive.

    With age or circumstances, menstruation cycles can change, but this method won’t as you will always count from the start of your last period and the date of your cosmobiological date.

    Come and join the LWTM community

     An Introduction to LWTM

    Here is a link where you can download our LWTM Freebies to start building your new holistic life today!

    Please note that this article was written as a source of information only. We do not know your unique circumstances and can not be held responsible for any kind of misinterpretation.  Thank you. 

    The Soil Revolution – part 1

    The Soil Revolution – part 1

    The soil revolution   The status quo –
    where are we now? 

    As far back as 2014, Reuters reported that a senior UN official said, “If we continue with our intense farming practices and destruction of wildlife at the current levels – we have realistically 60 years of sustainable farming left. “ (source Scientific American)

    This is a sobering thought. But what has happened on the official front since 2014?

    Where are the school campaigns that explain to children that to make 3cm of topsoil takes the earth roughly 1000 years, but we only have 60 left. Where are the billboards and media campaigns to the same effect? I am interested in this topic and apart from the occasional scientific paper, it does not seem to be ‘newsworthy.

    But this ecological wave is coming nearer and nearer and nearer. And the evidence is all too clear. Since 2014 we had more floods, bushfires, and heatwaves and the destruction simply moves on. First the coral reefs, then the icebergs in Antarctica, the increase of desert and soil destruction, and the massive, massive loss of wildlife. The last one is properly the most talked about topic. And it is lovely to look after the bees, but only bees and no other wildlife would never ever work.

    I know it is not the best place we currently find ourselves in, but this blog series is not meant to be just doom and gloom. The essence here is – what can we do about it?  And then act fast!

    Luckily there are a few men and women around who really grasped this concept early on and started doing something about it. Some of these methods are really ingenious and we will hear more about their various projects over the next few articles.

    But let’s start first at the beginning

    When Rudolf Steiner first taught his first Biodynamic soil lectures – now almost 100 years ago – this topic did not seem relevant and he was called a deluded dreamer for most of the 20th century. But not anymore.  Ever since scientists discovered microbes in the soil and even inside us,  the concept of ‘the living soil’ has moved from random fiction to fact.

    The first Biodynamic lectures were held just after the First World War and this is by no means a coincidence. Although this war was short (1914-1918), the world saw chemical warfare used for the first time in combat. The real war benefit was only established towards the end of this war, but with peace on the horizon all these chemical plants had no longer any use.  So a plan was hatched that these chemicals could in diluted form be brought out on the fields to get rid of ‘soil and leaf’ pests. This meant the farmer did not have to adhere to long-standing traditional methods of crop rotation, weeding and composting. The ‘miracle cure was of course much easier to administer.

    And initially the farmers were enthusiastic. Who would not like more yield and less work? But after a few years, the quality of the soil and produce deteriorated and some farmers asked Steiner for advice.

    Additionally, the first year a little bit of fertiliser did the trick, but with every subsequent year more and more fertilizer had to be used to achieve the same result. This is costly but after a while, there is not much of an alternative. left.  The farmers can’t just stop the farm for a couple of years in order to wait for the soil to revigorate. This is not a sustainable business model and the trap continues.

    What had happened?

    Let’s look first at how the soil works. Compost material (waste from the previous growing season) together with compost tonics and manure are put onto the fields and reinvigorate the soil. This usually happens in late autum (the end of the growing cycle)  and in early spring (the beginning of the cycle). This enables the billions of microbes in the soil to turn the compost into a fertile, nutrient-rich soil, ready for the next growing cycle. This humus is full of fungi, earthworms and insects. It is the ‘internet of the soil’, distributing moisture and letting plants almost ‘communicate’ with each other and certainly cross-fertilize each other (that is the principle of companion planting).

    But artificial fertilizers destroy all these natural soil improvers, turning fertile, alive soil (there are billions of these creatures in just a handful of earth) into dirt= dead soil.

    Lifeless dirt is then artificially fed to produce the next year’s crop, but there is no regeneration. Once this chemical is washed away by the rain, it is gone and more product has to be put on to replace it. But more importantly, the food you eat is ‘also dead’ as no or very few microbes survive. Dead food lacks nutrients and most importantly microbes. We need the soil and its creature for our survival, too.  IPS, bloating and more severe health crises can often be traced back to food that gives us fuel (and puts on calories) but does not actually ‘feed us’. And that is not even taking obesity and diabetes into account.

    I have often talked about the macro-organism and the micro-organism and how they work together. If you are new to this concept it is as follows:

    The Macro-organism is the universe, the planets, stars and micro-organisms are all living creatures. Beetles, birds, whales, lions, trees, flowers, and of course us humans. It is like a huge clockwork, every clog and wheel turns individually, but when in harmony they feed and enrich each other.

    Going back to the clock example. Taking a small wheel out of the clock may be ok, but destroying half of the clockwork – what do you think would happen? Most children could answer this.

    But this is exactly what we are doing with the planet. Currently, we are losing about 30 soccer fields EVERY MINUTE!

    We read above that the earth is capable of making 3cm of good quality topsoil in about 1000 years – please make the Maths.

    Additionally, the soil is responsible for catching carbon and hanging on to water. Dirt can’t do that and the results are floods and climate change.

    So, we are where we are, and no more gloom! From now on this series will turn to seek real, positive solutions.  We need to make this positive turning point for the sake of our children and grandchildren. The Soil Revolution has started and we are all hell-bent to reverse this damage done over the last 100 years. Come and join in and do your bit!

    Access here the second installment of the Soil Revolution series 

     

     An Introduction to LWTM

    Please click this link to find out more about LWTM and holistic lifestyle planning and  download our freebies 

     

    Halloween, witches and Samhain

    Halloween, witches and Samhain

          This post will delve deeper into the subject of Halloween, where it comes from, and its significance.

    The history of Halloween

    Halloween has its origin in the Celtic festival Samhain, celebrated on the evening of the 31st of October. This symbolized the end of the harvest season and the ‘death of the seasonal growing cycle’. It was also celebrated on the eve before All Saints Day or better known as ‘ All Hallow’s Day’- the day of the Saints and the dead Ancestors.
    halloween  The Celts believed in reincarnation. The highest honour was to die in battle. The body of a slain soldier or member of society was burnt on a pyre together with the corpse of their favorite horse. The cold ashes were collected in a clay jar and buried in a mound. For centuries these practices continued. The souls turned into invisible figures wearing cloaks with large hoods – just think of the grim reaper! These figures escaped in the moonlight to another world, unseen by those left behind and eventually reincarnated into another human, animal or plant.

    Moon gods, bulls and horns

    cow horns Many cultures, amongst them the Sumerians, Babylonians and Minoans worshipped moon gods and their sacred animals were the cows and bulls. Here is an article that explains a bit more about the Minoan culture and their practices with bull jumping, now believed to be a forerunner of the Olympic Games.

    Bull horns represented the moon cycle and the cycle of life. The first cave paintings dating back to 30,000 B.C. depicted horned animals together with the cycle of the moon. Horns decorated helmets and found their ways into the graves of the dead. The moon, fertility, celebrations and horns – all are symbols of the moon gods, celebrating the rhythm of eternal life.  Just like the seasons, we come, we go and we are reborn.
    As Albert Einstein once said, ” Energy doesn’t get lost, it only gets transformed’.  As the leaves sprout in spring and help the tree survive throughout summer and autumn. Eventually, they wilt and fall to the ground.  But that is not the end. The dead leaves now have a new purpose.  Rotted down, they produce precious compost which nourishes the trees and makes sure that the next growing cycle begins.

    A practice of Biodynamic agriculture sees the farmer fill a cow horn with manure in autumn. This gets buried into the ground for around 6 months. In late spring it gets dug up and the now well-rotted manure is diluted into a spray preparation that fertilizes the new crops on the fields. As weird as it sounds these preparations produce excellent results. It is most likely down to the microbes that find their way into the soil and nourish it.

    How come we dress up as witches at Halloween?

    During the Middle Ages and even before,  local herb women, so-called witches, ran the Ancient healthcare system. They delivered babies and attended to the sick and dying. They made concoctions and potions to give to their patients. They made these out of animal products and gathered herbs. Some medicines ask for blossoms, others for dried leaves or root extracts. Collecting roots usually happened during the evening or at night. The reason was that roots deemed to be less effective once exposed to direct sunlight. The logical time to gather these roots was around the Full Moon, as it provided the necessary light at night.  Digging out roots at Full Moon and being connected to the dead (as some patients undoubtedly died) – the myth of the witch was born.  It all fitted in nicely with Halloween, the festival of the dead.
    The connection between witches and Friday the 13th comes from the pagan lunar year. The Ancient Calendar year followed the path of the moon. Normally 12 moon cycles with the occasional  13th cycle added in to align the year again with the seasons. Friday was the day of worship for the Fertility Goddess Frigga. Friday the 13th became synonymous with the forbidden pagan knowledge and a particularly unlucky day.

     An Introduction to LWTM

    Please click this link to find out more about LWTM and holistic lifestyle planning and  download our freebies 

     

     

     

     

     

    GET YOUR LWTM FREEBIES NOW AND
    SIGN UP BELOW!

    Additionally, you will receive our monthly newsletter The Month Ahead at the beginning of each calendar month with more information.

    You have Successfully Subscribed!