Conceive with the moon

Conceive with the moon

moon goddess

Looking at the moon cycle can be very helpful if you are trying (or not trying) to conceive. All women are of course familiar with the female fertility cycle also known as the biological cycle.  Mid-cycle a woman ovulates and can conceive. This always occurs 14 days before the next period.

But if this is the only time during the cycle that a woman can conceive how is it possible that so many women conceive outside these fertile days – at ‘ technically not possible’ times’?  There has to be more to it!

This was the question that plagued the Czech doctor Eugen Jonas in the 1950ies.  He was a psychologist and listened to many stories of his female clients, who either suffered from unwanted pregnancies or lack of conceiving.

He, therefore, decided to look more closely into the subject matter of female fertility. He unearthed fragments from Ancient Greek and particular Babylonian texts, where doctors successfully calculated the optimum time for conception and birth control using a method that overlapped the time of menstruation together with the path of the moon.  Combining these old texts with his own research data he realized that each woman has a time in their cycle when she was more easily aroused and ready to conceive. This cycle varied from woman to woman, as it was dependant on the time she was born.

For example, a  woman born on a full moon day would always find this time in the lunar cycle the easiest to conceive. He then named this second fertility cycle – the cosmobiological cycle.

Once both cycles are taken into consideration, they form a nearly perfect birth control system that has a success rate of over 98%, higher than even the pill. But this system is completely free and natural and once known how to use it, every woman can use this method to control her own fertility – whatever her circumstances and wherever in the world she lives. 

I find it hard to believe that this system is not more widely known and available to all women.

Here is an example of how to use this method. 

The first step is to mark the start date of your last menstruation on your calendar. Then count 15 days on and this marks your ovulation date. Mark this day with a cross. As sperm can last up to 3 days and ovulation does not always happen bang on Day 15, I suggest you cross off 4 days before and 2 days after your calculated ovulation day. This should give you enough safety margin. 

So you should have crossed off Day 10 to 17 after the first day of your menstruation. This is the biological cycle and normally ‘natural birth control’ ends here with a success rate of around 55%. You can of course add additional measures like checking your daily temperature to make this method slightly more effective. 

But adding the next step should bring the rate up to a whopping 98%.

The next step is to find out your cosmobiologcial date (the date within the moon cycle you were born).   I am sure you can research what the moon was doing on the day of your birth. You would come up with a date like 3 days after New Moon, 6 days before Full Moon and so on.

Then check a current moon calendar and find which date corresponds to the current moon cycle. It may sound complicated, but once you know you are born on the 3rd day of the Waning Moon (so 3 days after Full Moon) you can just mark it on the LWTM life-style calendar for the coming month. 

To make it easier here is an example how to use the whole method:

We assume here that the first date of your last period was on the 1st of January, so you would cross off all dates between the 10th to 17th of January. If you were born on a Full Moon (and that month it was on the 24th January), then cross off the period between the 20th and the 25th Jan.

All the crossed-off days are the ones you can conceive, all other days should be safe for unprotected sex.

Many women ovulate in exact accordance with the lunar cycle and the times won’t change too much. But some have shorter or longer cycles and dates will slightly shift or even overlap. If this happens, then these days are super fertile days and are of particular interest if you find it hard to conceive.

With age or circumstances, menstruation cycles can change, but this method won’t as you will always count from the start of your last period and the date of your cosmobiological date.

 
What makes us human?

What makes us human?

       This is a question that undoubtfully all humans ask themselves at some point? I recently heard a talk about this subject and thought it was well worth exploring.  As I am currently working on the new calendar cycle and The Year Ahead,  when the famous question – what is it all about?  fleetingly raised its head. But was equally quickly succeeded by – What comes next and what are my plans for the year ahead?

It would be highly presumptuous of me to say that there is only one answer, of course, there is not. But the more I listen to experts who study primates in their natural environment and early human civilizations,  the boundaries between humans and animals are becoming ever clearer. Not that I see the human species in any way far more important or superior. The Biodynamic way of life sees all species, including plants, worms and even microbes in the soil as part of the WHOLE CYCLE and each play their unique part. But humans have qualities other species simply have not.

Over 70,000 years ago Neanderthals started to use instruments, discovered fire, and even played music. These ‘creative activities’ had not been seen before. This all got even more sophisticated around 48,000 B.C. when the  Cro-Magnons – the earliest humans- started to settle in today’s Europe and Africa.  Cave paintings and subsequently found tools show us what their civilization would have looked like and more importantly how they lived. Working with fire was by then well established, but this ‘new species’ showed creativity and the ability to plan ahead as no other species had done before.

In his book  The Pattern Seekers, Simon Baren-Cohen describes how humans became distinctly different from animals when they started to recognize patterns. And I would argue more importantly when they started to connect the dots. Animals tend to react, but humans plan ahead.

Initially, this ‘planning ahead’ was quite haphazard. But once early man discovered a predictably time-pattern in the sky, i.e. the cycle of the moon, ‘social planning’ became a lot easier. This was a big game-changer.  Once tribes knew how to operate these early time measuring tools – proper social planning was really on its way. Here you can find out more about how early humans created their first calendars. 

We know that humans were definitely collective beings right from the very start. And there is no reason to believe that this trend is slowing down. Just look at the very recent rise of social media and there is no doubt that humans thrive on collective interactions.

But then certain animal species, of course not all, also share this communal spirit.  Just look at how a pack of wolves or lions hunt together and share the prey (or fight over it!). Or how monkeys or whales come together and care for their young.

But what sets humans really apart is the communication of shared experiences. We do like events and we like to share them – live!
This has been the biggest impact of the  Coronavirus pandemic. It has taken away the ability to congregate, celebrate, and see ‘live events’ and share ‘in the flesh’-experiences? Technology has made great advances and I am sure we are all grateful for that. But ‘this common energy’ is missing. We don’t communicate just with words, there are so many unspoken cues that are impossible to pick up via a video screen.

I think once we are all vaccinated and free to mingle again,  we will treasure this ‘communal energy’ even more than we once did. Especially the senses of touch and smell, which have both been so neglected.

But until then the ‘virtual gatherings’ will prevail and I have finally taken the nudge and together with the new calendars, I have created a VIP Facebook group. At the moment this is on an ‘invitation only’ basis for some members.
But If you stumbled across Living With The Moon for the very first time, you are welcome to download our free introduction e-book by clicking the link below and maybe see you one day in our small, friendly and connected group.

 An Introduction to LWTM

Please click this link to find out more about LWTM and holistic lifestyle planning and  download our freebies 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spend time with the family

Spend time with the family

   TODAY IS A GREAT DAY TO SPEND EXTRA TIME WITH YOUR FAMILY. IF THIS IS NOT POSSIBLE, CALL YOUR PARENTS, SIBLINGS AND CHILDREN OR ANYBODY THAT YOU ‘CALL FAMILY’. SHOW THEM THAT YOU CARE FOR THEM!
Life is busy and whilst rushing here and there – we often forget what matters most. So here is a symbol that is less biodynamic, but more a reminder to stop for a moment and create a harmonious thought/action for the ones who should be closest to us. 
I realise that this is an idealist view and sadly many people don’t have a harmonious family life. If that is you, then make a positive change today. How could you improve communication, repair strained relationships? What is the way forward? Is it time for a call to say ‘sorry’ or clear the air. Don’t be proud, make a head start and show you care. 

 

Menstrual cycle – a better way forward with the ‘Mooncup’

Menstrual cycle – a better way forward with the ‘Mooncup’

moon cupThe curse’, as many refer to the monthly female bleeding has never been a great topic of conversation. But it is an important one as over a life time a woman spends an absolute fortune on sanitary products, an estimated  £18,000

See more info 

But is there another way.  Something to save you a lot of money and is also good for the environment (just imagine the colossal  mountain of used sanitary towels and tampons that collect just in one year, not to mention all these clogged up toilets!).

It is called the moon cup and I have used it myself for over a decade now. It is a silicone cup that is very comfortable and safe. Find out more about the Mooncup. 

When I was doing a bit of research of how many women in my neighbourhood knew facts about the menstrual cycle and the moon cup, I started a conversation with a 30ish year old woman and  was shocked when she revealed that she did not really know how many days a normal female fertility cycle lasted for or even how to count fertile days and so on. She just relied on the pill. I would have expected this response from a 14 year old girl, but not from a grown woman. I pointed her to this website and rushed home to complete this article.

What is the menstrual cycle?

 This is a series of changes that occur in a woman’s body on a roughly monthly basis. First the ovaries release an egg and this is called ovulation. At the same time your body prepares your uterus for a possible pregnancy. If the egg is indeed fertilised by a male sperm, then a nine month pregnancy is the consequence. But most of the time this does not happen, so the egg is no longer needed and the lining of the uterus sheds the egg  and this is called menstruation.

How to find out the average length of your menstrual cycle

Always count from the first day of your period until day before your next period. This is the length of your menstrual cycle. It varies from woman to woman, but anything between 21 to 34 days is seen as ‘normal’. The average time is 28 days, which is the same length as the moon cycle and the  reason why so many civilisations connected the moon with fertility. (Please read more about fertility in the article  Conceive with the moon.  )

Be also aware that if you are taking extra hormones, such as the pill or an iud with hormones, this can alter the length or frequency of your natural menstruation cycle.

Know your body

If you never suffered from heavy or painful periods or use a permanent contraceptive you may not pay much attention to it all. But I believe that  start dates, flow rates and regularity can give you important clues about the state of your health. So get your diary out (or the  monthly LWTM calendar – it is free, but you need to sign up to our list for this ), then circle the first day of each period, it is that simple.

What should you look out for? 

  • Length.  Over time you work out the average length. You need this information to find out if you are pregnant. A delayed period without pregnancy can point to a health problem or the onset of the menopause
  • Flow. Stronger periods could point to fibroids or onset of the menopause
  • Irregularities. Women with premature ovarian failure and ‘polycystic ovary syndrome’ are prone to irregular or lapsed periods, so too are women who suffer from eating disorders,  substantial weight loss/gain or are still breastfeeding.
  • Consult a doctor if
     – you  have had no period for more than 90 days and you are not pregnant
    –  you develop a strong bleeding and bleed more than seven days
    – bleed mid cycle and/or are in serious pain

  Here is  link to the official moon cup site.