What is the big difference between biodynamic gardening and traditional gardening? This is a question I have been asked a lot over the years?

The gardening techniques may seem similar, but what is radically different is the overriding philosophy behind it. A non-biodynamic gardener wants, on the whole, to make her/his plants look the best with whatever method is a quick and convenient way. ‘Weeds’ are controlled with pesticides and the soil is a means to grow flowers/plants, but no particular thought is given to it beyond that function. Snails, earthworms, and most insects (with the exception of bees) are not welcomed and exterminated. This will give you a nice garden but often to the detriment of the wildlife.  The yearly use of pesticides and chemical fertilizers will lead to soil erosion and the extinction of many insects/worms and other species further down the line.

  The biodynamic approach is more wholesome. It all starts with the soil and great effort is made to keep the soil in a very good condition. The additions of soil tonics, organic sprays, and earthworms play a big part. If a plant grows in the ‘wrong place’, it is not just called a weed and discarded. Instead, it is carefully hoed out and used to make compost (although it needs to be rotted down first as active seeds may otherwise contaminate the compost heap). Take for example the nettle. In the ‘biodynamic world,’ a nettle is never seen as a weed, but as a useful byproduct of nature. You may not want it growing in your favorite flowerbed and hoe it out from there. But you won’t discard it, but rather replant it to a part of the garden that is less prominent. Nettles are one of the best garden fertilizers and you will need nettles on-site to make your nettle brew fertilizer. 

  Where does the word ‘Biodynamics’ come from? The phrase ‘Biodynamics’ was created by Rudolf Steiner and is made out of the Ancient Greek words ‘bio’ (life) and dunamis (power). A biodynamic garden is managed as one single complex organism. Everything there is useful and helps to keep the ecosystem in check. In essence, Steiner described Biodynamics as an ‘ecological and sustainable approach to agriculture/gardening that increased soil fertility without the use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides’. It follows that bees, earthworms, and other insects are not harmed but welcomed and put to good use. However, that does not mean that there is no pest control at all. Of course, there is. But it is done in a sustainable/organic way and not as a blanket extermination program. To make Biodynamic gardening more effective, people use biodynamic calendars to harness the ‘best natural times’. We made it easy here and have created symbols for the most important gardening tasks.  You can also check out the category Happy House in the LWTM lifestyle calendar (the member’s version and you will find the code in the monthly newsletter if you are a subscribed member).  Once you have seen the Happy House category, just choose the task you want to look up and it will give you the best dates.  Otherwise,  check out the date and you will find which symbols correspond with the current date.  Here is a link to the LWTM calendar.

Click here to read more about how Biodynamic Gardening works

Let’s touch on some of the gardening symbols
Composting 

biodynamic compost heap

The waste from one year is the fertile soil for the next. If you have space for at least 2 compost bins, please install them. They don’t need to be fancy, even two dug-out holes in the ground with some kind of cover would do. What matters is how to assemble the compost and when you do it. Here is an article that explains Biodynamic composting in more detail.

The symbol to look out for is.    composting and soil tonics 

 

 

Preparing the soil 

biodynamic compost

Today is ideal for turning the soil, weeding, bringing out the compost to sprinkle it around your plants, and sieving it over the lawn.
Making your compost is not that hard. All you need is a good compost bin and time (see below). It is a precious commodity to have in your garden
and it is 100% compatible with your garden’s soil conditions as it is made from its waste products. 

The symbol to look out for is.     

 

Repotting houseplants and planters on the patio/balcony

Your houseplants need to be repotted every or every other spring, depending on how quickly your plant grows. But once roots produce out of the pots it is time to go a size or 2 bigger. It might be a good 
idea to change your pots and spruce up your home. Leave an inch or 2 of space between the roots ball and the pot. This will give it enough space to grow into the new pot to extend the growing time. If your roots are fine, just add a bit of new compost earth to add extra nutrients, then feed and water as usual. 

The symbol to look out for is.     

 

Organic pest control 

We want to encourage wildlife, especially bees and earthworms. But when it comes to aphids and other destructive forms and a plant is suffering, you can help it recover with a few biodynamic rescue remedies. 

The symbol to look out for is.     

 

Watering and feeding your plants 

There are best days for watering, just look out for them on your calendar and you won’t forget or drown your plants. Here is a small guide on how to water correctly 

The symbol to look out for is.     

 

Pruning trees and bushes 

Cutting bushes down in season and at the right time will keep them happy and healthy for years to come. These are of course general pruning dates, for individual plants the rule of thumb is after flowering or for deciduous trees/bushes during the winter time. Revival pruning of deciduous trees and shrubs for more info. 

The symbol to look out for is.    Pruning trees and evergreens 

 

There are of course many more symbols. But here are a few to get you started on your biodynamic gardening venture. 

 

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