Achieve health, success and happiness with holistic lifestyle planning

Learn how to lead a happy, healthy and fulfilled life

Did you know that every day has an individual energy or “day quality”?

Living with the Moon has taken this ancient knowledge and updated it for a busy 21st-century lifestyle.

We translate the day quality into down-to earth  practical tips, recipes and advice.

Our Living with the Moon Lifestyle Calendar The Month Ahead helps you to align your decisions and actions with nature’s own rhythmic cycles.

LWTM reconnects to you to nature, folkloric traditions and encourages you to see the world in a more holistic way.

Jutta

Founder of Living with the Moon

Your Free Calendar and Guide

The Art of Living with the Moon

 

Our lifestyle system can help you to look great, maintain a healthy diet, improve your career, love and social life, save time and money by timing your activities for optimal impact with the lunar cycle.

When you subscribe you’ll receive:

The Month Ahead Lifestyle Calendar

 The Month Ahead lifestyle calendar with practical tips, recipes, and lifestyle advice.

Goal planner

E-book ‘LWTM goal planner’, a vital tool for setting and achieving goals. 

An Introduction to Living with the Moon

Free introductory e-book ‘Living With The Moon’

“Knowing how the phases of the moon affect the likelihood of weight gain or loss has proven immeasurably helpful in maintaining a healthy weight and getting my figure back following the birth of my son”Maureen

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What does it mean to Live with the Moon?

When you look at your watch or get your diary out, you are using tools whose origin are directly inspired by the movement of the moon. As the moon rotates around the earth it exerts a specific gravitational pull, giving each day a unique ‘day quality’. Our lifestyle system shows you ‘what to do’ and ‘when to do it’ making many activities much more effective. 

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Baking bread

Baking bread

Today’s task is extra baking/cooking. You can always freeze this in small portions. This is a very efficient way to create home-made meals. 

Make your own bread: 

It has recently become really popular to make your own artisan bread. I have had breadmakers for years and been doing my own sourdoughs. But here is a quick and easy recipe for all those who want to give it the first try. The recipe below is for a simple and tasty mixed loaf that can be done in any conventional oven. No breadmaker or sourdough needed.

 You will need kitchen scales, the ingredients below, a ceramic dish with a lid (ideally round), a bowl, and a mixing spoon.
Ingredients:  560g wheat flour, 190g rye flour, 550g hot water, 16g salt, some cumin seeds (1/2 a teaspoon should be enough), 3gram of active yeast. You could add some linseeds or other seeds if you like. 

1) weigh all the ingredients and put them together into a big kitchen bowl.  I use a big mixing spoon to blend them together. Then add some flour to your hands and knead the dough.  (please use enough plain flour on your hands, otherwise, the dough will stick to you). After a few minutes of kneading, cover the bowl with a kitchen towel, and leave it to rest. I suggest a minimum of 3 hours. You could also prepare the dough in the evening and let it rise overnight. Then it will be ready for baking the next day. 

Tip: To see if the dough is ready for baking. Pull some upwards.  If it rips easily it needs to rise a little longer.  A dough that is ready for baking should glide out and not rip straight away. Traditionally you let the dough rise up to 5 times. It sounds complicated, but you let it rise in the bowl and then just take a few minutes to knead it again and let it rise again. It makes sense to make a few bread loafs at the same time. 

2) Once the dough is ready,  preheat oven to 250degree C (480F) and put the empty ovenproof dish with lid into the oven. Yes, that is right – empty to heat it up!

3) Take it out when it is very hot (be careful handling it!) and add some sprinkles of plain flour to cover the bottom of the pan. This is important as otherwise the bread will stick to the pan and it will be hard for it to come out.
Then add the dough. With the mixing spoon create a line in the top of the dough – that is where the crust can rise and sprinkle some plain flour on the top.  Put the lid on and bake the bread (middle shelf) for about 35 minutes.
My Tip: Pour water into an oven dish and put it on the bottom shelf, so the bread bakes it in moist air.

Sourdough starter: 

This is an old recipe from my grandmother. In Austria most loaves of bread are sourdoughs and when I was a child I can only ever remember eating sourdough bread. Here is a recipe for your very own sourdough starter. If you put it together today, it will take a minimum of 5 days before you can use it. But once you have started, you can keep your sourdough going for years. If fact, if it is fed regularly, it gets better and better. My current one is about 3 years old. You can then give part of your starter away to friends – to give them a headstart in their own process. 

What is sourdough? 
In essence, it is fermented dough that you add to your bread mixture before baking.
The reason it has become so popular is that it tastes so good as well as being beneficial for your digestion. Sourdough contains strains of the helpful lactobacillus, also called the friendly gut bacteria. If you suffer frequently from bloating or even IBS, switching to sourdough from a conventional bread might be a good move.

Here is how to make the starter: 
You will need 250ml of milk, 250ml water, 1 tbsp of sugar, 2.5 teaspoons of dry yeast, and 450g of plain flour.  If you are lactose-intolerant try to do just warm water instead. 

Warm the milk to almost boiling and add the water and sugar. When the temperature has cooled to 40degreeC (105F) add the yeast. Cook at a very low temperature for about 5-10 minutes. It is important that the yeast starts to foam a little. Pour this mixture in a container that has a lid and add the flour. Mix well. Initially, you need to keep the lid off as it is essential that air can get to your new starter. I suggest you cover it with a tea towel or muslin cloth. Keep it stored in a warm place like an airing cupboard. The warmer the better – around 30C (80F) is ideal. After a day or 2, it starts to bubble. It is important to stir it once or twice a day. Soon a greyish liquid will form on the top – don’t be alarmed. This is absolutely normal and good. Hurrah it’s working! 

Once it starts to smell sour – hence sourdough – it is ready to use. Now you can put the lid on and that is how it is stored. If you don’t intend to bake immediately put it in the fridge. There you can keep it literally for years!  Beware it is a live organism and therefore needs the occasional feeding to stay alive. 

This is how to do it: Replenish it with 120 ml warm water (4fl oz) and 120g of flour. That’s it. Leave it to bubble up (ideally do this a day before baking and leave it outside). Then return it back into the fridge when it is no longer needed. 

If you keep your dough outside, you need to replenish quite regularly (say once a week), when I keep it in the fridge, I only do it sporadically, usually after using it or at least every 2-3 weeks. Even if you don’t use it, it needs the occasional stir otherwise it will separate too much. 

Now you are good to go. You can add this sourdough starter to the bread recipe above and you will have baked your first sourdough bread. 

A time for healing

A time for healing

 THIS SYMBOL REPRESENTS HEALING & HAPPINESS    I recently had so many inquiries about healing-related subjects. So I decided to make  HEALING - TOPIC OF THIS MONTH. As we can all do with an 'extra dose of healing' right now.  Although Living With The Moon is...

OUR FOUNDER

Jutta

The Living With The Moon biodynamic lifestyle program has been developed and researched in the UK for the last ten years.Its founder,  Jutta Russell, grew up learning about this holistic lifestyle from her mother and grandmother who have both lived with an awareness of the lunar cycle and passed down many natural (and now often forgotten) useful tips. 
What our subscribers say
“Knowing how the phases of the moon affect the likelihood of weight gain or loss has proven immeasurably helpful in maintaining a healthy weight and getting my figure back following the birth of my son”.Maureen
What our subscribers say
‘I have followed this system now for years and I can only endorse it. My hair is better, and so is my garden. Every month I look forward to reading the newsletter especially the beauty tips and the calendar. Keep up the good work!Christine